Special Collections Event May 3&4, Erickson All Sports Facility, 8am to 2pm


For Local Computer Recycling,
Recycle old appliances at RJ Recycling
1800 Garfield Ave. Parkersburg, WV 26101
(304)422-6587 www.rjrecycling.com

Electronics Recycling

The use of electronic products has grown substantially over the past two decades, changing the way and the speed in which we communicate and how we get information and entertainment. According to the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA), Americans now own approximately 24 electronic products per household. 1

Electronics being RecycledDonating used electronics for reuse extends the lives of valuable products. Recycling electronics prevents valuable materials from going into the waste stream. Consumers now have many options to recycle or donate for reuse their used electronics. Many computer, TV, and cell phone manufacturers, as well as electronics retailers offer some kind of take back program or sponsor recycling events. About half of the states currently have  laws on disposal and recycling of electronics and several other states are considering passing similar laws.

Unfortunately not every electronic recycler follows environmentally sound recycling practices; however, responsible electronics recyclers and refurbishers can now become certified by demonstrating to an accredited, independent third party that they meet available standards on responsible recycling practices. EPA encourages all electronics recyclers to become certified and all customers to choose certified recyclers. Visit the  eCycling Certification page for more information.

Reusing and Donating Electronics

Preventing waste in the first place is preferable to any waste management option...including recycling. Donating used (but still operating) electronics for reuse extends the lives of valuable products and keeps them out of the waste stream for a longer period of time. Reuse, in addition to being an environmentally preferable alternative, also benefits society. By donating your used electronics, you allow schools, nonprofit organizations, and lower-income families to obtain equipment that they otherwise could not afford.

Before donating your computer or other electronics, make sure the equipment is reusable. Donation organizations have limited or in many cases no resources and employees to diagnose and repair hardware. A functional, working system—especially with monitor, wiring, and software licenses—is a lot more useful and requires less upgrading than a nonworking, incomplete computer. Check to see what the donation organization’s minimum computer requirements are (e.g., Pentium processor, Windows 95). Donation organizations might not accept (or might charge a fee for) older, less useful equipment (e.g., 386 processors, dot matrix printers, less than 14 inch color monitors).

As a business, you might be able to take advantage of tax incentives for computer equipment donations. The 21st Century Classrooms Act encourages large companies to donate computer equipment to public and private schools. When donating equipment to a nonprofit organization, inquire about documentation that can be applied toward your income tax return.

The most appropriate donation organization for computers can vary from area to area. In some cases, the most viable donation organization might be a charity, but in other areas, the appropriate donation organization might be the local school district or materials exchange. Visit Ten Tips for Donating a Computer to learn more.

Recycling Electronics

If donation for reuse or repair is not a viable option, households and businesses can send their used electronics for recycling. Recyclers recover more than 100 million pounds of materials from electronics each year. Recycling electronics helps reduce pollution that would be generated while manufacturing a new product and the need to extract valuable and limited virgin resources. It also reduces the energy used in new product manufacturing.

One thousand or more municipalities offer computer and electronics collections as part of household hazardous waste collections, special events, or other arrangements. In addition, public and private organizations have emerged that accept computers and other electronics for recycling. Depending on where you live and the amount of equipment you have, the best recycling option might be a county recycling drop-off center, TV repair shop, charitable organization, electronics recycling company, or even your local electronics retailer, which might collect used products and send them to a recycler. You can learn more about local electronics recyclers and collection events at EIA Environment – Consumer Education Initiative and at My Green Electronics.

Many electronics manufacturers are accepting used household electronics for recycling. In some cases, these services are provided free-of-charge. Asset management and recovery programs have been available to major corporations and large purchasers of electronic equipment for quite some time. Now, electronics manufacturers are beginning to offer similar services for households and small businesses. The consumer pays to mail the product back. Fees keep changing, but generally range from seven dollars up. Some manufacturers and retailers are offering free or for-a-fee events in communities.

Source: http://www.epa.gov/osw/conserve/materials/ecycling/basic.htm